Where the Science of Psychology Meets the Art of Being Human

When Someone You Love Has Anxiety

431,888 views

When you love someone with anxiety. Man. Woman. Child.

Anxiety is unpredictable, confusing and intrusive. It’s tough. Not just for the people who have it but also for the people who love them. If you are one of those people, you would know too well that the second hand experience of anxiety feels bad enough – you’d do anything to make it better for the one going through it.

We all have our ‘stuff’ – the things that we struggle with. Ultimately, they are the things that will make us braver, wiser, stronger, more compassionate and better humans. It’s just the way it works. The difference with anxiety is that the struggle is more visible.

Whether we struggle with anxiety, confidence, body image – whatever – there are things that we all need to make the world a little bit safer, a little bit more predictable, a little less scary. We all have our list. When someone you love has anxiety, their list is likely to look at little like this:

  1. It’s no biggie. So don’t act like it is.

    In the thick of an anxiety attack nothing will make sense, so best not to ask what’s going on or if they’re okay. No. They won’t be okay. And yes. It will feel like the world is falling apart at the seams. They’ll be feeling awful, but they’ll get through it. If you’ve seen it all before there’ll be no need to ask anyway – and they’ll love that you know not to. Ask if they want to go somewhere else – maybe somewhere quieter or more private.  Don’t panic or do anything that might give them the idea that you need looking after. Go for a walk with them – physical activity is the natural end of the fight or flight response, which is the trigger point of anxiety. Otherwise just be there. They’ll know what to do. They’ll have done it plenty of times before. Soon it will pass and when it does they’ll be able to talk to you about what has happened, but wait for that. Then listen. We all love when someone is able to just be there.

  2. There’s a bit to know, so if you can understand everything you can … well that makes you kind of awesome.

    It makes a difference to be able to talk about anxiety without having to explain it. On the days they don’t feel like they have it in them to talk about it, it means a lot that you just ‘get it’. If you’ve tried to understand everything you can about what it means to have anxiety then that’s enough. Anxiety is hard to make sense of – people with anxiety will be the first to tell you that – but it will mean everything that you’ve tried. They’ll love you for it.

    You Might Also Like
    The Things I've Learned About Anxiety - That Only People With Anxiety Could Teach Me

  3. It’s physical.

    Anxiety is a completely normal physical response to a brain that’s being a little over-protective. It’s not crazy and it’s not deficient. There’s a primitive part of the brain that’s geared to sense threat. It’s all action and not a lot of thought and it’s in all of us. For some people, it fires up a lot sooner and with a lot less reason than it does in others. When it does, it surges the body with cortisol (the stress hormone) and adrenalin to get the body ready to run for its life or fight for it. This is the fight or flight response and it’s in everyone. It’s just that in some people (people with anxiety) the ‘go’ button is a bit more sensitive.

  4. You’ll want them as part of your tribe. (Seriously. They’re pretty great to have around.)

    Because of their need to stay safe and to prepare against the next time anxiety rears its head, people who struggle with anxiety will generally have a plan – and they will have worked hard to make sure it works for everyone involved, not just for themselves. They’ll make sure everything has been organised to keep everyone safe, happy, on time and out of trouble. They’ll make sure everyone has what they need and if there’s anything that hasn’t been thought of, well it’s probably not worth thinking about. Notice the good things they do – there are plenty. Let them know you love them because of who they are, including who they are with anxiety, not despite it.

  5. Anxiety has nothing to do with courage or character. Nothing at all.

    Courage is feeling the edge of yourself and moving beyond it. We all have our limits but people with anxiety are just more aware of theirs. Despite this, they are constantly facing up to the things that push against their edges. That’s courage, and people with anxiety have it in truckloads. Remind them that you see who they are and that this has nothing to do with that anxiety thing they do sometimes. People with anxiety are strong – you have to be to live with something like that. They’re sensitive – they’ll be as sensitive to you and what you need as they are to their environment. That makes them pretty awesome to be with. They’re reliable – to control for the potential of something triggering an attack, anxious people will go the extra step to make sure there’s a plan and that everyone is safe, happy and have everything they need. They’re intelligent – they’re thinkers (which is what gets in their way sometimes). They can be funny, kind, brave and spirited. So I suppose it’s like this – they’re no different to anyone else. As with everyone, the thing that trips them up sometimes (their anxiety) is also the thing that lifts them above the crowd.

  6. Make sure there’s room to say ‘no’. And don’t take it personally.

    Sometimes plans might need to be changed to steer clear of anxiety stepping in unexpectedly. People with anxiety will be sensitive to your needs (they’re pretty great like that) and changing plans isn’t something they’ll do lightly. Your flexibility will never be taken for granted. There are many things in the environment that most people think nothing of, but which can be the beginning of an anxiety attack for a brain on hyper-drive. Things that are ambiguous or neutral can sometimes be read as a threat – not by the person, but by an overprotective brain. People with anxiety are super-aware of everything going on – smells, sounds, people, possibilities. It’s exhausting when your attention is drawn to so many things. Don’t take ‘no’ personally – they’re never meant like that. Know that just because they might not want to be doing what you’re doing, that doesn’t mean they don’t want to be with you. Keep offering – don’t assume everything you offer will be met with ‘no’ – but be understanding and ‘no big deal’ if you aren’t taken up on your offer. They are saying no to a potential anxiety attack. Not to you.

    You Might Also Like
    Anxiety in Kids: How to Turn it Around and Protect Them For Life

  7. Loads of lovin’ never hurt anyone.

    Be compassionate and be there. Talk up the things you love about them. There will be times that people with anxiety will feel like they are their anxiety and that they are a source of difficulty. (Who hasn’t felt like they’re making things harder than they need to be? C’mon be honest.) Specifically, I’m talking about when plans have to be changed, when you need to book a few rows back from the front row, turn the radio down, take the long way. If this is the worst you have to deal with in a friend, sign me up.

  8. Anxiety can change shape.

    Anxiety can be slippery. Sometimes it looks the way you’d expect anxiety to look. Other times it looks cranky, depressed or frustrated. Remember this and don’t take it personally.

  9. Don’t try to make sense of what’s happening.

    People with anxiety know that their anxiety doesn’t make sense. That’s what makes it so difficult. Explaining that there’s nothing to worry about won’t mean anything – it just won’t – because they already know this. (Oh boy do they know this!) They would have told themselves not to worry a billion times the number of times you’ve said it to them. If it hasn’t helped so far then one more won’t make a difference. Be understanding, calm and relaxed and above all else, just be there. Anxiety feels flighty and there’s often nothing that feels better than having someone beside you who’s grounded, available and okay to go through this with you without trying to change you. Telling them not to worry is as effective as asking you not to think about pink elephants. Really try not to think about pink elephants swinging from a vine. With flowers in their hair. Just stop thinking about them, those crazy big pink babes. See how that works?

  10. Don’t try to change them.

    You’ll want to give advice. But don’t. Let them know that to you, they’re absolutely fine the way they are and that you don’t need to change them or fix them. If they ask for your advice then of course, go for it. but otherwise, let them know that they are enough. More than enough actually. Just the way they are. 

  11. ‘You just need to get over it,’ said the person who doesn’t get it.
  12. Anxiety just happens and often there’s no real target. So if you’re suggesting they just need to ‘get over it’, the obvious question is get over what? If people with anxiety only needed a bit of direction to ‘get over it’, they would have given it to themselves and been over it long ago. Telling them to get over it is like telling them they’re doing something wrong. You don’t tell an asthmatic just to breathe. Tough love isn’t love. It’s just tough. Actually it isn’t even that.

  13. Don’t confuse their need to control their environment with their need to control you. Sometimes they look the same. They’re not.

    The need to control for everything that might go wrong is hard work. For the same reasons that drive anxious people to make sure that everyone has what they need, everyone is looked after, that things are under control and the likelihood of anything turning bad is minimised – for the same reasons you’re looked after – you might also feel controlled. See it for what it is. It’s the need to feel safe and in control of the possibility of anxiety running the show – not the need to control you. You might get frustrated – that’s okay – all relationships go through that. Having compassion doesn’t mean you have to go along with everything put in front of you, so talk things out gently if you need to. Don’t be critical though. Nobody likes that.  Just remember, while your resistance might look more like a ‘won’t’ theirs looks more like a ‘can’t’.

And finally …

Know how important you are to them. Anyone who stays around through the hard stuff is a keeper. People with anxiety know this. Being there for someone during their struggles will only bring the relationship closer. Nothing sparks a connection more than really getting someone, being there, and bringing the fun into the relationship – because you’ve gotta have fun. Be the one who refuses to let anxiety suck the life of out everything. And know you’re a keeper. Yep. You are. Know that they are grateful – so grateful – for everything you do. And that they love you back.

Like this article?

Subscribe to our free newsletter for a weekly round up of our best articles

281 Comments

Nancy

I only wish I could have read this 15 years ago. I would have done things differently. My daughter has taught me so much about anxiety. She is an incredible human being.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

It’s so easy to look back and wish we could have done things differently when we finally have the information – but the good thing is that it’s never too late to start. Our knowledge about anxiety has grown incredibly in the last 15 years. There’s so much that we know now that we had no idea of back then. Our kids can be our greatest teachers, can’t they – your daughter is very lucky to have a mother who is so open to that. (And I have no doubt you would say right back, ‘and I’m very lucky to have her’)!

Reply
Nancy

Thanks for your response. We also talk about the possibility of her children suffering from anxiety. My response was with all our experience-knowledge she could identify any signs early and be so supportive.
Her greatest piece of advice she has taught me was ( is) to listen and acknowledge what she says.

Reply
Taylor-Lynne

This hit home on so many levels! Felt like I was reading about one of my own relationships. Thank you for putting everything so well, this was very helpful.

Reply
Roz Levine

I couldn’t stop crying as I read this because it described me so well and it felt good that someone “got me.” I’ve sent this on to family members and hope they’ll better understand me and many others we know who are filled with anxiety. And yes, we make good friends who’ll keep you safe when trouble is brewing in a life.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

I’m so pleased this made sense for you! I have a couple of people in my life with anxiety so I really get how the things that get in the way sometimes also make them amazing people to be close to. I’m really pleased you’ve sent this to your family. Even with all the love in the world anxiety can be a difficult thing to understand from the outside.

Reply
Karen

Do you know me?
Cause this was written for me, and I am so fortunate to have a wonderful, loving husband to help me deal with all of my quirks.

Reply
Karen Dunlap

Yes he loves me no matter what. He is an angel plucked from the Heavens. Without him, there would be no me.

Reply
Karen hanson

Such an excellent article! This will help me a great deal with a dear friend who suffers from anxiety! Thank you!

Reply
Kat

Thank you! My 15 year old son suffers with anxiety- it can be really difficult when it means missing school- but an article like this really backs me up with the understanding and flexibility I give him. We take each day as it comes- what you have written reminds me it’s not only hard for me, but excruciating for him. Thank you so much.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

You’re so welcome. Anxiety can be awful for everybody, can’t it. It’s always good to be reminded that you have a really good reason for doing the things that you might not ordinarily do if anxiety wasn’t a factor. Sounds like you and your son are a pretty great team.

Reply
Emma Titford

Thank you, this ha given me some great insight into my daughter’s anxiety and sometimes her behaviour. Her frustrations and need to control situations, I now realize, are more to do with anxiety then stubbornness, especially in relation to friendships. She is 11 and last year moved from a small school to one 4 times the size. In reality, she is doing extremely well. This will allow us to have gentle conversations during times when she is not overwhelmed to explain relational topics and encourage her.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

I’m so pleased this has helped you. Anxiety can be hard to understand from the outside. Gentle conversations – absolutely the way to go. You’ll make a difference.

Reply
karen

This means so much to me this article its hard to talk about how you’re feeling with anxiety but just having one person in your life what understands it makes a difference today has been so hard everyday its such a struggle

Reply
Hey Sigmund

I’m so pleased this has helped you! I know how difficult it can be to explain anxiety to someone who has never struggled with it before. I want you to know that you’ll always be understood here.

Reply
Jan

Thank you so much for this, it is very helpful! 🙂
Over the past year or so my adult daughter has developed occasional anxiety, and your post is a real eye-opener. I sent her the link and she said it describes what she feels a lot of the time.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

You’re so welcome. It’s so difficult watching the people we love struggle with anxiety. I’m so pleased this has helped you.

Reply
Jan

I shared this with my husband and after discussing it with him afterward, we now recognize that this is something our daughter has struggled with for many years. She was very challenging to raise and like Emma who commented above, we felt it was stubbornness/strong will. Oh how little did we know. . .

We might’ve handled things differently had we known back then what we now know thanks to your article, but despite any mistakes we may have made as parents we are very pleased with and so proud of the young woman she has become. She is smart, determined, compassionate, funny, and pretty much an around great individual! We’re so happy she’s a part of “our tribe”

Reply
Chad Keeton

This really is perfectly written. I have never been able to put it in words on paper. This is it exactly and thank you for writing this. Made me smile and not feel alone.

If anyone wants to talk ever please call me anytime and I will listen and enjoy it – ckeeton10@gmail.com

Best of luck everyone! Stay strong!

Reply
Hey Sigmund

You’re awesome. I love the community we’re building here at Hey Sigmund. Finding people who have had similar experiences is so healing and so important. Thank you for keeping the conversation going.

Reply
Johanna

How would you suggest supporting a partner who gets anxious when you are upset?

For example if I experience an emotional event, they (because of their anxiety) end up steering the conversation around to their own concerns. Sometimes this feels very unsupportive and as if my concerns don’t matter. How can I let them know that I need support while ensuring they still feel supported by me?

Reply
Hey Sigmund

I understand what you’re saying. This can leave you feeling like you’re going through things on your own. If your partner’s anxiety is triggered by the things that are going on for you, there may not be any awareness of what’s going on. It’s important to slow things down so that you have the opportunity to explain and your partner has the opportunity to hear you and understand. ‘When you get upset, I feel as though I have to look after you and that I can’t look to you for support. You really make a difference when you’re there for me, but it’s hard when you get upset. I know it upsets you when I’m upset but that doesn’t help me at all. Sometimes we need to be there for you and sometimes we need to be there for me. Would that be okay?’ Try this and see what happens. The most important thing, if you want to be heard, is not to say anything in a way that could be taken as blame. If people feel shamed or blamed, we lose them for a while. I really understand your frustration. The main thing is to keep talking about it. I hope this helps.

Reply
Mary

Hello,

My ex and I encountered problems due to his anxiety and depression. He suddenly broke up with me when everything was fine. Over the phone. But a couple weeks later, we were communicating again (very minimally and on his schedule). He said he still felt very strong feelings for me but he was still unsure and confused by a lot of things. He was confused if were are right companions for each other because our different interests. And he feared he couldn’t undo the damage he has done. I was trying so hard to be supportive. I have read countless articles about anxiety to understand better. But it has been 2 months and we are still broken up. He barely talks to me. I heard from him maybe once a week. When we did text, I kept reassuring to him that his needs and anxiety don’t make him a bad person, but its the way he approaches these problems that matter. I told him that I felt used lately because he barely talks to me. And since we are broken up, it feels like he just wants me available for when he is bored and lonely. His response to my concerns was “Then maybe we should limit our interactions more if I make you sad.” I told him I don’t understand how communicating even less will make me happier. But he just stopped responding. It makes me sad that he shuts down and avoids communicating the rare times that I express my needs and wants. I didn’t hear from him for a few days after that, and then I finally sent him a goodbye email. I told him that I want to invest my time with someone who is sure he wants to be with me and doesn’t care we like different music and movies. I told him that I love him but the way he suddenly stopped talking to me is unfair. Its been 3 weeks since I sent that email and I still feel so lost and heartbroken. Should I still given it time with him? Or did I make the right move to move on with my life? I can’t tell if he was just stringing me along or if his anxiety and depression could cut me out so harshly….Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

I honestly think you’ve done the right thing. The proof of that is that you haven’t heard from him since you sent the letter three weeks ago. Anxiety and depression doesn’t cut people, people cut people. If he wanted to be with you, he would find a way to let you know. You deserve to be with somebody who lets you know you are loved and wanted, not somebody who keeps you guessing. If he wanted to be with you, he would be. I know this feels awful right now, but you will get through it. You deserve to feel wanted and adored.

Reply
Ewa

I love this article… And I love my boyfriend for staying with me and doing all of this. He has no idea how supportive and wonderful he is.

Reply
Wendy Moravec

Thank you. That’s the major just of it, just thank you. Yes I also have an Anxiety Disorder. I know I don’t make sense during an episode. But my family dealing with me is so much more. I also have Panic Disorder, Generalized Depression, PTSD, Social Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, a little Agoraphobia, and Bipolar Disorder Type II. So when I have an attack, all those enter the picture too and I rage. A lot at my Mom even though she is my safe place, the one that listens, etc. I don’t know why my raging panicking anxiety often picks on her, unless it’s because I know, deep down, she will still love me once I finally find the end of the tunnel and cry so much, apologies all over, and such guilt. I feel like a monster after, like I could have let it all out, yet I know until I feel that shift, what feels like stubbornness, controls me. I wish there were articles for all my sicknesses, but looking too much into a mental health page is…not good for me you could say.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

You’re very welcome. It sounds as though you have a bit going on at the moment and that can’t be easy. Taking things out on the people we love the most is something we all tend to do. Anger is something we grab as a way to keep more uncomfortable emotions at bay – we all tend to do this. The uncomfortable emotions that anger might hold down and stop from surfacing are fear, insecurity, grief, confusion – it’s different for everyone. It’s understandable that you feel rage and anger when you feel anxious or panicked. The main thing is that in relation to your mom, you’re quick to love her, appreciate her and acknowledge your part in what’s happened when things settle down – and it sounds as though you do that. Try not to be so hard on yourself – I can tell from your comment that you have a lot of wisdom and a loving, open heart.

Reply
Gracie

I’ve never been able to explain an anxiety attack even though I have tried. Next time I’m just sending them this article. It is a struggle everyday but it’s also a triumph when you get past it. Thank you for your words and for understanding people like me.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

You’re so welcome. I’m pleased this article has been able to help you. I have a couple of people in my life who have anxiety and they’re up there with my favourite people. People with anxiety – like them and like you – can be pretty wonderful people.

Reply
Jim

Hello and thank you for the article. My wife has anxiety and I have a few observations.

“They’ll make sure everyone has what they need and if there’s anything that hasn’t been thought of, well it’s probably not worth thinking about.” If only it were that easy. Until that thing comes up that they didn’t think about and it’s a colossal event over something small.

“They are saying no to a potential anxiety attack. Not to you.” This can be tough when we want to experience certain things together rather than go alone and we miss out on those moments. Do they feel the same way or are they just relieved they don’t have to do that thing? I feel it would be nice to know that she is sad she can’t do those things as well. I’m sure she is more relieved than sad but still.

Lastly, There are few people that have endless amounts of patience and I am not one of them. I always try to apply these steps, the execution is not always great but I do try.

Reply
Hey Sigmund

I really understand where you’re coming from. Living with anxiety isn’t easy for anyone – the people who have it and the people who love them. We all have our ‘stuff’ though, and relationships are always about trying to fit with each other’s vulnerabilities. It sounds as though you work really hard to do that.

Reply
Abi

My sister suffers from anxiety, as do I. Unfortunately we approach it is two different ways, she has become reclusive and won’t work and expects the world to accommodate her, I approach it by pushing my boundaries, recognising when I can’t do something but also worrying a great deal about how my ‘limitations’ affect others. Even as an anxiety sufferer myself I sometimes lose my temper with my sister. Anxiety can be a very selfish illness. I would not beat yourself up too much about your lack of patience. As the article states, having compassion doesn’t mean you have to go along with everything and the last thing you want is to become resentful.

Maybe encourage your wife to have other ‘safe’ people and maybe find yourself another confidant for talking through your problems? we like to think our relationships can be all encompassing but sometimes they can’t! I often have to remind myself that my partner is not my girlfriend and some things need to be shared with others and not him.

You are doing an awesome job Jim x

Reply
lyn

your website is very helpfull thankyou i was looking for some advice . my son is 22 he has seen a doctor. not realy helpfull . he droped out of collage twice. has not worked at all .i thought he was lazy for along time as he would hide himself in his room .so i never new he was having these attacks , then thay got so bad he came out of his room in the middle of one. i didnt know what to do. i called the doctor he talked him down and maid an appointment the next week. he was told to make an appointment with a counciler which he did .onlyhe had an attack the night before and was in no state to go ,as he missed the appoinment thay said he couldnt have another for six weeks, he carnt even go to job center to sign on so he and i are living on my pension ,he dosent go out at all and wont have friends round. thuogh he dos talk to them on internet.im at a loss as to what to do for him,the doctor says has advised him,

Reply
Hey Sigmund

You’re very welcome. It sounds as though counselling will be an important part of helping your son to get his life back. Anxiety can be so debilitating and I really understand how difficult it must be for you to be watching him go through this. When anxiety gets to the point that it’s interfering with life to the point it is with your son, some sort of counselling intervention is important to help manage the anxiety and to stop things getting worse. I know it must feel awful for both of you at the moment, but anxiety is definitely something that can be managed with the right support. Counselling will be important for your son, given how severe it sounds, but I understand that sometimes the anxiety can be so severe that it makes getting to the appointment really difficult. Here is an article about some things that might help at home while you’re waiting for the appointment to come around http://www.heysigmund.com/anxiety-without-medication/. I wish you and your son all the very best and hope that he is able to find some relief soon.

Reply
Jennifer

Thank you so much for this! My husband is currently struggling with my anxiety. He doesn’t understand or even try to. He gets hurt and takes it personal when I get anxious. I am praying this article will help him to understand me, even if just a little bit. Just today, he woke up early (couldn’t sleep) and decided to go into work early. He got in the shower, keeping me from getting in and therefore disrupting my entire morning routines and schedule. He couldn’t understand why I freaked out over this. I can’t wait to have him read this! It’s written all about me!!!!

Reply
Thea

Thank you. My partner started having anxiety attacks a few months ago. So far I guess we both thought this was a one-time (two-time, three-time) thing. But after cancelling our plans for a weekend-getaway last week, we both feel like this is our new situation and it will – for now at least – be here to stay.
I feel that right now I am the one struggling to accept is. I wonder what about our holidays in October? What about our long-time planned trip to the USA in winter (we live in Europe)? What about visiting my parents which live in another part of the country? Will I now always have to go out alone, meet friends alone, go for a holiday alone?
These days, it’s my partner who has to take care of me, while I feel guilty, because he’s the one living with anxiety. I should be the one supporting him. When I told him so, he said “I am constantly reassuring myself, I might as well tell you the same things that I am telling myself all the time. And sometimes I need you to support me, now you need me to support you. That’s the way it goes.”

Reply
Hey Sigmund

Your partner is absolutely right and has explained it beautifully. A relationship is about looking after each other. There will be times when one of you needs it more than the other, and that’s okay. We all have things that we struggle with and in a relationship, the struggle is often shared. It sounds as though you have a wonderful partner who is able to recognise that at the moment, you’re struggling a little and are in need of support. There will come a time when this swaps over, and you’ll be the one who is there to give strength and comfort to him – it’s all a part of the natural ebb and flow of a relationship, especially the good ones. Here is some more information that might be useful for you – ‘Anxiety and Intimate Relationships: How to Stop it Stealing the Magic’ http://www.heysigmund.com/anxiety-and-intimate-relationships-how-to-stop-anxiety-from-stealing-the-magic/

Reply
David Peterson

Thank you very much for writing this, Karen. My girlfriend and love of my life has been living with anxiety for most of her’s. I want to do my very best to understand and be there for her. Reading each point listed here has definitely helped me with that!

Reply
abigail fletcher

Articulating anxiety when for you it is a perceived flaw is very difficult. I have struggled many times to try to tell people that I am not ‘broken’ or ‘less’ even if I feel it myself. Your article is one of the most elucidate and compassionate I have read – its doesn’t make excuses, it explains and I love that. We all have our battles, but some of us have bigger ones….one thing I would add is the anxiety of trying to be ‘normal’ in what one would consider ‘normal’ situations i.e. a party can all add to the pressure we already put on ourselves, a little kind consideration is great!

Reply
Hey Sigmund

Thank you very much for your comment and for sharing your experience. I’m so pleased this article has helped you. Anxiety can be difficult for people to understand if they’ve never experienced it before and I understand what you mean by the anxiety of trying to be ‘normal’ in a situation that other people would already consider to be norma.

Reply
Jacqueline McNaughton

I am someone who suffers from severe anxiety and cried the whole while reading this. So beautiful. As someone who’s living it this is spot on. Thank you.

Reply
33

I wish I could find the perfect words to explain how deeply touching this is for an anxiety sufferer.
I feel like this is so perfectly written, what a graceful way to approach a very difficult issue for those who just have no true idea…Thank you endlessly… Such a compassionate genius.

Reply

Leave a Reply

We’d love to hear what you’re thinking ...

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Stay Connected



Contact Me

karen@heysigmund.com














Hey Warrior - A book about anxiety in children.
















Pin It on Pinterest

Share This