Content Share Guidelines

Content Share Guidelines

I love you sharing the work on Hey Sigmund as much as I love you reading it.

All work published on Hey Sigmund is protected by international copyright laws, so there are just a few things to keep in mind:

•  You are welcome to share links to any content contained in Hey Sigmund. The truth is, we’ll love you for it.

•  You are welcome to quote up to 75 words of content from any article in your own blog articles as long as you attribute ownership as follows:

– Articles that do not have a specified author are written by me, so for these articles, please attribute Karen Young and www.heysigmund.com as the source and create a link to the original Hey Sigmund article.

– Articles written by guest authors will be noted as such either in the title or in the ‘About the Author’ section at the end of the article. For these articles, please attribute the author noted in the bio with a link back to the original Hey Sigmund article.

•  Unless you obtain my prior written consent (which may be granted in exceptional circumstances) the republication or reprinting of full or substantial sections of any articles word for word on the web is not permitted, even if you provide full credit and links back to Hey Sigmund.

•  You are not permitted to profit from the use of my content.

•  This one goes without saying but since we’re talking anyway … you cannot claim any content on Hey Sigmund as your own original ideas.

•  If you are wanting to print hard copies other than for personal use, please contact me for consent (which will never be withheld for a good cause).

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The reading of Hey Warrior, Hey Awesome, or But We’re Not Lions out loud and sharing this online in any format, whether through Facebook, YouTube or on your own website is a breach of international copyright and is not permitted.

Thank you for your co-operation and most importantly, thank you for sharing the information and for keeping the conversation going.

2 Comments

James P White

Hi,
I would just like to say that I love your weekley newsletters and your facebook page. As a qualified Psychotherapist and Hynpotherapist currently still studying and learning every day I have learned lots of great ideas that assist me in my daily practice and also great information that I pass on to my friends and clients. Thank you so much for sharing and caring.

Kindest Regards
James White

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The point of any ‘discipline’ is to teach, not to punish. (‘Disciple’ means student, follower, learner.)

Children don’t learn through punishment. They comply through punishment, but the mechanism is control and fear. 

The problem with this, is that the goal becomes avoiding us when things go wrong, rather than seeking us out. We can’t influence them if we’ve taught them to keep their messes hidden from us. 

We can’t guide our kiddos if they aren’t open to us, and they won’t be open to us if they are scared of what we will do. 

We all have an instinctive need to stay relationally safe. This means feeling free from rejection, shame, humiliation. The problem with traditional discipline is that it rejects and judges the child, rather than the behaviour. 

Hold them close, reject their behaviour. 

This makes it more likely that they will turn toward us instead of away from us. It opens the way for us to guide, lead, teach. It makes it safe for them to turn and face what’s happened so they can learn what they might do differently in the future.

Rather than, ‘How do I scare them out of bad behaviour?’ try, ‘How do I help them to do better next time?’ 

Is the way you respond to their messy decisions or behaviour more likely to drive them away from you in critical times or towards you? Let it be towards you.

This doesn’t mean giving a free pass on big behaviour. It means rather than leading through fear and shame, we lead through connection, conversation and education. 

The ‘consequence’ for big behaviour shouldn’t be punishment to make them feel bad, but the repairing of any damage so they can feel the good in who they are. It’s the conversation with you where they turn and face their behaviour. This will always be easier when they feel you loving them, and embracing who they are, even when you reject what they do.♥️
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#parent #parents #mindfulparenting #gentleparenting
Kununurra I’m so excited to be with you tonight. I’ll be giving you super practical ways to strengthen your kiddos and teens against all sorts and all levels of anxiety - big anxiety, little anxiety, anxiety about school, separation, trying new things - all of it. You’ll walk away with things you can do tonight - and I can’t wait! Afterwards we’ll have time for a chat where we can dive into your questions (my favourite part). This is a free event organised by the Parenting Connection WA (I love this organisation so much!). The link for tickets is in my story♥️
Hello Broome! Can’t wait to see you tonight. Tickets still available. The link is in my story. 

Thank you Parenting Connection WA for bringing me here and for the incredible work you do to support and strengthen families.♥️
What a weekend! Thank you Sydney for your open hearts, minds and arms this weekend at @resilientkidsconference. Your energy and warmth were everything.♥️
I LOVE being able to work with early childhood centres and schools. The most meaningful, enduring moments of growth and healing happen on those everyday moments kids have with their everyday adults - parents, carers, teachers. It takes a village doesn’t it.♥️

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