A big warm welcome to you.

There will be new videos added constantly. If what you’re looking for isn’t there, let me know – I’d love to hear. One thing is for certain, if you’re wondering about something, loads of other people will be too. It takes a village.

The video library is divided into three sections:

So … what’s it all about?

Being human is an, exciting, messy, ridiculous, sometimes brutal, sometimes glorious adventure. At different times we will have all thrived, struggled, loved and lost and from all of this, we grow – wiser, stronger, braver, better than before – because that’s what being human is about. The video library is a roadmap towards strength, happiness and empowerment, full of information and strategies to master the beautifully imperfect art of being human. 

Here’s what you need to know straight up – you have everything inside you to lead a happy, healthy life. Sometimes it’s about knowing where to look, or about knowing what to do with it when you find it. A solid pulse will always come in handy, but to live – really live – it’s about knowing where to find that well inside you that has all the courage, wisdom and strength you need to make life-giving, empowered decisions. 

Who are the videos for?

The videos are for everyone – adults, teens, kids, parents, counsellors, teachers, health professionals … and the list goes on. If you are any version of human – strengthened, enlightened, depressed, anxious, empowered, disempowered, hurting or happy – you will gain valuable insights and information through the videos. 

As well as this, the videos will provide the support and information for any children or teens in your life to be the extraordinary adults they are capable of being. (Oh if only we all knew this way back when!)

If you are open to new information and new ways of doing things, there will be something here for you. When we know how things work, we can actively change them in ways that work for us – but information is key. Here you will find solid information based on real science. From this, you can make decisions about the things you want to change, do more of, less of, get rid of, or ignore like a bothersome thing.

What’s in it for me?

There’s so much to gain from psychology’s insights into way we humans think, feel, live and love. But it’s all pointless if the information isn’t delivered in a practical, interesting, jargon free way. Oh but for the love of almond croissants and all things bakery – where am I going to find that you say?

With the right information, lives change, people change and relationships change. We become better humans, partners, siblings, parents, and friends. Above all else, with the right information we become better for ourselves. It’s just the way it is.

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Our children and teens can feel anxious, and do brave - but they don’t need to do it all at once. They can happen in tiny brave steps, one after the other. 

Start by encouraging them to notice the difference. Some things that feel scary will be best avoided - dark alleys, snakes, walking alone at night. Sometimes though, those things that feel scary will be growthful and important - exams, school, trying something new, approaching a challenge, taking a safe risk, separating from you when there is another loving adult who will take care of them. These things are scary, but safe. For sure, they might come with failure, or humiliation, or they might not work out as planned, but they are safe. 

Part of living bravely is having the confidence that even if my ‘what if’ happens, I’ll be okay. I can take safe risks, because whatever happens, I’ll be okay. I can do hard things, because whatever happens I’ll be okay. And we know they will be. Actually they’ll be better than okay because most times, enough times, they’ll shine.♥️
When children are in big feelings - big anxiety, big anger, big sadness - it will be really difficult for them to bring themselves back to calm without us. This is because the part of the brain that can calm big feelings isn’t quite built yet. Until it is, they’ll be looking to us for a hand. Even as adults with fully developed brains, we sometimes need the loving presence of our special person or people to help us through those big times. 

When children are in big feelings it’s less about what you do and more about who you are. They are looking for an anchor - a strong, steady presence to help bring their their world back to steady. When you calm your breathing, it will calm your nervous and let you guide theirs back to calm. 

This is NOT rewarding big behaviour. In fact, it’s doing the opposite. The brain learns from experience, so the more we guide them back to calm, the more they develop the capacity to do it on their own.♥️
Brains love keeping us alive. They adore it actually. Their most important job is to keep us safe. This is above behaviour, relationships, and learning - except as these relate to safety. 

Safety isn’t about what is actually safe, but about what the brain perceives. Unless a brain feels safe and loved (connected through relationship, welcome in the space), it won’t be as able to learn, plan, regulate, make deliberate decisions, think through consequences.

Young brains (all brains actually) feel safest when they feel connected to, and cared about by, their important adults.  This means that for us to have any influence on our kids and teens, we first need to make sure they feel safe and connected to us. 

This goes for any adult who wants to lead, guide or teach a young person - parents, teachers, grandparents, coaches. Children or teens can only learn from us if they feel connected to us. They’re no different to us. If we feel as though someone is angry or indifferent with us we’re more focused on that, and what needs to happen to avoid humiliation or judgement, or how to feel loved and connected again, than anything else. 

We won’t have influence if we don’t have connection. Connection let’s us do our job - whether that’s the job of parenting, teaching - anything. It helps the brain feel safe, so it will then be free to learn.♥️
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#parenting #parentingforward #parentingtips #mindfulparenting #neurosequentialmodel
Children are born whole and with the will to do good, but none of us are born knowing what to do or how to do when things feel big. That comes with time, lots of practice, and the loving leadership of adults who have been there before.

It can be tempting to hurry their development, or measure our own parenting by how well our children behave but development  just doesn’t work this way. Like all good things, it takes time to be able to manage big feelings or unmet needs enough so they don’t inflame big behaviour. Even as adults we won’t always act in adorable ways. (Oh don’t I know it!)

Learning how to manage big feelings without sliding into big behaviour is like anything hard we or our children learn - how to play tennis, play the guitar, read, cross the road. None of these are learned through punishment or harsh consequences. They’re learned with practice and the steady guidance of adults who ‘do with’ and take the time to show us how. The time it takes and the bumps along the way are no reflection on the adults doing the teaching, or the children doing the learning, but a reflection on the magnitude of the challenge. It’s big!

The more we take it personally when our children don’t behave as we (or the world) would like, the more likely we’ll move into shame and judgement (of them and ourselves). Ultimately this will impact our capacity to actually give them what they need, which is patience, trust in our leadership our capacity to guide them, and our strong loving presence.♥️
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#parenting #positiveparenting #mindfulparenting
When we punish, or do anything that drives emotional separation (shame) or physical separation from us, it teaches our children to avoid us, or please us. It teaches them that failure, falling short, or making a mistake is shameful. It doesn’t teach them anything about what to do instead, or how to learn, or how to deal with things not going to plan.

Rather than, ‘What punishment do they need to do better?’ try, ‘What support do they need to do better?’ What they need - what we all need - is someone who is calm, strong, loving, and who can handle them enough to stay when them and guide them through the tough stuff. When we focus on the relationship, it opens the way for us to guide behaviour.♥

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