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Compelling Research Discovers A Potential Cause of Depression Symptoms

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Research Finds Possible New Direction for Treatment of Depression

Compelling new research has discovered a previously unknown cause of depression, opening way for new potential new treatment pathways. The significance of this enormous as over half of all people who have major depression are not able to find relief from antidepressants. 

There is no single known cause of depression but we do know that it takes more than one biological change to trigger an episode.

Inflammation in the brain seems to be one of these changes, with new research finding a compelling link between brain inflammation and major depression.

Brain scans were compared between people with clinical depression and those without. The scans revealed that brain inflammation in people with depression was 30% more than those without. The inflammation was highest in those people who were experiencing the most severe depression.

Inflammation in the brain serves a similar protective function as it does in the rest of the body, but too much can be damaging.

Evidence is increasingly pointing to the role of inflammation in generating the symptoms of major depression such as low mood and appetite and sleep disturbances. The role of brain inflammation on clinical depression seems to be independent of any other physical illness.

The findings have significant implications for the development of new treatments. Lead researcher Dr Jeffrey Meyer explains, ‘It provides a potential new target to either reverse the brain inflammation or shift to a more positive repair role, with the idea that it would alleviate symptoms.’

Our knowledge of depression and its possible causes is expanding all the time, opening new paths and possibilities for effective treatments.

Like so many illnesses, depression draws a circle around one person and draws those who are close to that person in. See here for what to do when someone you care about has depression.

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4 Comments

Wanda

I have thoroughly enjoyed your articles on depression and anxiety in children. Is this anxiety in children more prevalent in boys or girls or the same? Thank you so much for your insight.

Reply
heysigmund

I’m so pleased you’ve enjoyed the articles. Now about the prevalence in boys and girls, it depends on what sort of anxiety. Social anxiety and separation anxiety are more common in girls. Girls are also twice as likely as boys to have panic attacks. Girls are also more likely to develop generalised anxiety disorder – about 2 in 3 are girls. Obsessive compulsive disorder are about equal. Hope this helps.

Reply
Clara McBride

It seems inflammation is being connected to so many of our health problems. Will the same dietary changes recommended for inflammation in other parts of our body help reduce inflammation in our brains as well?

Reply
heysigmund

This such a good question. This research is in its very early days and researchers are still exploring the implications. There are many connections being made between diet and mental health. I’ll certainly be following the research and posting about it. Thank you for making contact with me.

Reply

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Hey Warrior - A book about anxiety in children.








Hey Sigmund on Instagram

Our kids are going to make bad decisions. Hopefull Our kids are going to make bad decisions. Hopefully they’ll make plenty - it’s one of the ways they’ll learn and grow. We won’t always be able to love them out of a bad decision, but we want to be the ones they come to when the mess unfolds. 
When they get it really wrong, they’ll know it. They’ll also know exactly what we think. Of course we’ll be tempted to remind them over and over of what they’ve done and the fallout from that, but it will be useless. There is no new wisdom in telling them ‘I told you so’, and it also runs the risk of switching them off to our influence and guidance at a time they need it most. 
There will be wisdom in the mess for sure, and the best way to foster the discovery is to make a safe space for this to happen - and there is no safer space than in their connection with you. 
When we prioritise connection above lectures, criticism, or judgement, we clear the path for self-reflection. This is where the magic happens. When they feel safe with us, and free from shame or disconnection, we have enormous power to facilitate growth - ‘Can you tell me what happened? I know you’re a great kid and I’m wondering what made this feel like a good decision? What can you do differently next time? I know you didn’t mean for this to happen but it has, and I’m wondering how you might put things right? Do you need my help with that?’ When we strip it back to bare, discipline was always meant to be about teaching, and this will never happen when there is shame or when they feel disconnected from us. You are their everything. They don’t want to do the wrong thing and they don’t want to disappoint you - but they will, lots of times. 
With every one of their bad decisions is an opportunity to guide them towards growth, but only if we keep them close and hold their hearts gently amidst the breakage. When we keep their hearts open to us, they will open their minds and their mouths too. They will talk and they will listen, and they will know that even when their behaviour is ‘questionable’, they are our everything too.

Our kids are going to make bad decisions. Hopefully they’ll make plenty - it’s one of the ways they’ll learn and grow. We won’t always be able to love them out of a bad decision, but we want to be the ones they come to when the mess unfolds.
When they get it really wrong, they’ll know it. They’ll also know exactly what we think. Of course we’ll be tempted to remind them over and over of what they’ve done and the fallout from that, but it will be useless. There is no new wisdom in telling them ‘I told you so’, and it also runs the risk of switching them off to our influence and guidance at a time they need it most.
There will be wisdom in the mess for sure, and the best way to foster the discovery is to make a safe space for this to happen - and there is no safer space than in their connection with you.
When we prioritise connection above lectures, criticism, or judgement, we clear the path for self-reflection. This is where the magic happens. When they feel safe with us, and free from shame or disconnection, we have enormous power to facilitate growth - ‘Can you tell me what happened? I know you’re a great kid and I’m wondering what made this feel like a good decision? What can you do differently next time? I know you didn’t mean for this to happen but it has, and I’m wondering how you might put things right? Do you need my help with that?’ When we strip it back to bare, discipline was always meant to be about teaching, and this will never happen when there is shame or when they feel disconnected from us. You are their everything. They don’t want to do the wrong thing and they don’t want to disappoint you - but they will, lots of times.
With every one of their bad decisions is an opportunity to guide them towards growth, but only if we keep them close and hold their hearts gently amidst the breakage. When we keep their hearts open to us, they will open their minds and their mouths too. They will talk and they will listen, and they will know that even when their behaviour is ‘questionable’, they are our everything too.
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