Dads and Daughters: The Biggest Way to Be Her Hero.

Dads and Daughters: The Biggest Way to Be Her Hero

My parents divorced well after they should have. I can remember the way they would hold each other in a full embrace or let their hands touch while they were sitting beside each other in the car or on the couch. I remember the gentle way they talked to each other and the way they made each other laugh sometimes. I loved that. Sometimes I would interrupt a kiss – one of those long, tender kisses that are gross and unnecessary through the eyes of anyone younger and blood related. 

Then I remember the silence. The awful, empty clamour of a silence that never used to be there.

No fighting. No yelling. No arguing. Just silence. The shift wasn’t a sudden one. It happened over time but through it all I always felt like he loved her. Whether he did or not doesn’t matter, because feeling as though he did was what made the difference. Even when things were strained, he would say lovely things about her to us. Sometimes I would feel the warmth of that as though it was around me too. It was never enough to connect them but it was enough to lift me above the ache of it all, for a little while anyway.

At the time I didn’t know there was another way to be. The dads love the mums and that’s the way the world worked. It made me feel secure and treasured. Treasured because when he was kind to her, I felt that kindness and tenderness as surely as if it was for me. I took the lovely things he said about her personally, because she was my mum. I was proud of her, he made sure of that. If he said awful things about her, which he never has, I’m sure I would have taken those just as personally.

I don’t know what happened when I wasn’t watching. Something did though, or maybe not enough. I don’t know, but there came to be a distance between them that felt hollow and sad. Something wasn’t right between them, I knew that, but I also felt as though it was something about the mix of them, and nothing about the way he loved her. Maybe it was. I don’t know. And it’s not for me to care. What matters is what I believed, and I believed that he still loved her purely and completely, even if neither of them loved the combination of the both of them very much any more.

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Through my naive little girl eyes, I believed all women were princesses – because that’s how he treated her. Even when things weren’t right between then, he treated her like she was made of sunlight and precious things. I came to think that all little girls would grow up to be adored by someone who would love them so much, that nothing else would matter. It wouldn’t matter if they didn’t talk. It wouldn’t matter if there was a distance between them. Or if one day they just stopped holding hands and talking tenderly to each other. It wouldn’t matter. 

After a while, they separated. They probably should have separated long before they did. Even after this, he never did or said anything to change my belief that all little girls would grow up to be women who deserved to be loved tenderly, respectfully, kindly, beautifully – because that’s how he treated the woman in my life – like she deserved to be loved that way, even when he would have had his own reasons to treat her like she wasn’t.

My point is this. Dads hold so much power over the way their daughters will grow up to see themselves. The power comes not just from the way they treat their little girls, but also from the way they treat the mothers of their little girls. 

It would have been so tempting for my parents to trash talk each other. It would be tempting for any person to speak badly of an ex, especially one who is hellbent on making your life miserable – I get that – but for dads with little girls, know that you will lift her above the chaos and heartache of a divorce by speaking kindly of her mother, or at the very least, by not saying awful things. Whether you love or hate her mother, she’s the only mother your little girl has – and your daughter will love her, in the same way your daughter will love you. Kids just do. They love their parents no matter what, even the ones who don’t deserve it.

It’s not easy to be kind to someone who has hurt you. It mustn’t have been easy for my mum or my dad – they hurt each other, as everyone does when a relationship turns bad. I know that now, but I’m so grateful to him for never making me feel as though I shouldn’t love her. He could have done that, but he didn’t. Whatever he did or said, I would have loved her anyway. I just would have kept it a secret from him. 

Little girls feel like little versions of the women they came from. Even if her mother doesn’t deserve to be treated like a princess, every little girl deserves it, and there won’t be another man in her life who can make her feel that through to her core like her dad. There will be men who come into her life and love her, but the messages from dads are the ones that are there for the longest, and if we let them, the ones that settle in the deepest. The greatest thing a dad can do is make sure those message that are settling deep into the essence of are ones that she won’t have to fight against one day. 

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To dads, anything you do to love her mother, even if you don’t think that her mother deserves it, will help your daughter to learn how to receive love, give love and most importantly, it will influence the way she expects to be loved – because you will have shown her. You will have shown her not just by the way you’ve treated her, but by the way you’ve treated her mother. She’s watched, she’s listened and she’s felt it all – for better or worse. When you’re kind to your daughter it will help her to define the way she sees herself. When you’re kind to her mother it will define the way your daughter expects the world to see her, because you’re teaching her that this is what all women deserve, not just her, and not just from her dad. The message moves from ‘but of course you say that about me/ treat me like that/ do that for me – you’re my dad,’ to ‘all women deserve to treated well / with kindness/ with respect – you did it even when you didn’t have to, and even when it was hard.’

Dads are heroes. Ask any little girl and she’ll tell you. However you treat her mother, is what your daughter will expect from the men she chooses to let close to her. The world might shake her self-belief at times, but she’ll always know somewhere deep within her that she deserves love, respect, tenderness and kindness from the man she lets in – not just when she’s being who he wants her to be, but always.

It’s easy for dads to treat their little girls like princesses. It’s not always so easy to treat their mothers that way. I learned a long time ago that dads don’t have to love mums. They don’t even have to like them. But a little girl with a dad who treats her mother with respect and kindness and, if he can, with tenderness and so much love has a hero walking beside her. 

8 Comments

Susan

Thank you so much. There is so much here that is helpful and that I will take on board. One thing particularly is making it about his behavior, not about him. I knew this, but I think I was forgetting. Also, your advice about being the person I want him to be. That’s so empowering 🙂 With my gratitude for your compassionate response.

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kim

This is a comment 4 years later! but just incase someone else, like me, is following these conversations:
I found my young daughter conditioned by the ugly dysfunction of our broken relationship when my husband and I seperated and I would coach her saying ‘ people who love each other (insert the required action) are kind, say sorry if they’ve been mean, think of nice things to say to each other’.
It reconditioned me too.

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Susan

Thank you for this article. I separated from the father of my child as soon as I was strong enough, because I didn’t want our child to see a bad relationship. I had grown up in one and knew how distressing it is for a sensitive child. Now I have had to explain to my child’s father many times how he needs to be respectful to me in front of our son. Because the father doesn’t believe I have the right to have feelings – I should just serve as a useful mother – I get that kind of vibe from my son too. It is difficult to negotiate a real and loving relationship with my son when faced with his father’s long-running anger at me (because I left him). Having said this, my son does express his love for me in quiet ways, and I know he loves me and feels that I love him unconditionally. Do you have any advice for teaching my teenager not to take a mother/woman for granted, but to (eventually) be appreciative and grateful, as well as respecting his own needs and boundaries?

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Hey Sigmund

One of the jobs of an adolescent is to separate from his parents. This can feel really awful and as though you’re being pushed away. Often, the closer the parent-child bond before adolescence, the more you might feel the push-away as your son tries to find where you end and where he begins. It’s important to know that this is really normal. The fact that your son shows his love to you in quiet ways is lovely, and important, but I understand that there is another issue here, and that’s your son watching his father and modelling off him in the way he treats you. The best way to teach him about boundaries and respect is through your own expectations of the way he treats you. Keep your boundaries strong between yourself and your son’s father, but try not to speak badly to your son about his father – not because his father doesn’t deserve it, but because you don’t want to give your son more reason to push against you. It’s about noticing and making note of the behaviour without judging it – let the your son make his own judgements about his dad’s behaviour when he’s ready. Try something like, ‘I understand your dad is angry at me and I’m sure he thinks he has his reasons, and if that’s how he feels that’s up to him, but I’m not okay with you speaking to me like that.’ Let your son know what you expect. You won’t necessarily be able to change him, but he will see that you have boundaries and that he gets more from you when he respects them than when he doesn’t. Stay as calm as you can and make it about his behaviour, not about him. Try not to change him – that will come. I’ve found that the more you try to actively influence a teen, the more they’ll push back against you, but if you can validate them (‘I understand why it’s important for you to do your own thing sometimes.’ or ‘It’s difficult for you sometimes when things are awkward/ angry/ between our dad and and I isn’t it. I understand that, but when your with me I need us to speak well to each other, because we deserve that. Okay?’ Being the person you want him to be is the best way to influence him. He wouldn’t want to disconnect with you, but being a teen is hard work and they’re being driven by a brain that’s changing and adapting to the world as an adult. It’s pretty normal for teens to pull away for a while. They come back but it might take time – and that’s okay. It’s just what they have to do. The more you can model the behaviour you want him to take on – setting your own boundaries calmly, lovingly redirecting him when he’s crossing them, having a strong idea of what is and isn’t okay with you – the more likely he is to steer himself in that direction. It takes time though – for all of them. I know it might feel as though he is taking on more from his father than from you – I really get that – but be a strong, loving, non-judgemental presence and let him see what that looks like. Here is a couple of articles that might help you:

. Proven Ways to Strengthen the Connection With Your Teen: https://www.heysigmund.com/proven-ways-to-strengthen-the-connection-with-your-teen/
. Parenting a Teen: https://www.heysigmund.com/parenting-adolescent-11-insights-will-make-difference/

I hope these help. Try to remember that if you feel distance between you and your son, it’s a really normal part of adolescence. He’s testing the world, himself and the people he loves to try to figure things out. You sound like such a wise, loving presence in his life. Keep doing that – your son might not admit to it yet (that’s not at all unusual!) but in time he will come to see how important you are and how lucky he is to have you.

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Hey Sigmund

I really understand how difficult it is to hold back on how you feel when you’ve been hurt like this. The important thing is to separate your relationship with your ex-husband and your daughter’s relationship with her father. If your daughter senses that she should feel sympathy towards you, even if you deserve it, it will put her in the difficult position of feeling as though she has to choose between you and her father, and that might end with her feeling less close to both of you. Whatever he was like as a husband, he’s the only father she has so she needs to be free to be as close to him as she needs to be without confusing it with how you feel about him. Let your relationship with her be completely independent of him and she will be free to see things as they are without feeling the need to protect him or justify her relationship with him. You’re absolutely right when you talk about modelling self respect for yourself. It sounds as though you’ve got that covered. As for modelling a healthy relationship, knowing what not to go for is also important, and you’ve shown your children that. What you’re doing is something so hard, but I know I don’t need to tell you that. You’re modelling a healthy self-respect and you’re being clear about what’s acceptable and what’s not. If you can give your children the freedom to choose what sort of relationship to have with their father, it will be good for them and great for your relationship with them. As hard as it is, remember that you’re ready to leave the relationship with him, but they’re not. You’ve shown a lot of strength and self respect – I really admire that – your children will notice that and they’ll be better and your relationship with them will be be better, and with everything you’ve been through, you deserve that.

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Lisa

Thank you so much for your thoughtful response. I always find your words comforting and inspiring.

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Lisa

What I’m finding the hardest is the knowledge that for too many years I allowed myself to be treated with love, affection and generosity and then alternatively with disrespect, drunken anger and condescension. Now that we are divorcing (later than we should have), my 20 year old daughter and her younger brothers have been witness for too long of a bad example of a marriage. I’m afraid they don’t really know what it means to respect and cherish someone, and that will mean that they will have difficulty in knowing how to respect and cherish a partner of their own. The difficulty I’m having is that my daughter has seen her father behave badly, including objectifying women, aggrandizing behavior, and alcohol abuse )and seen me act disdainfully, critically and withdrawn in response), and knows her father has been unfaithful to our marriage many times. But now that we are divorcing, she doesn’t seem to have much sympathy for how hard this is for me or how hurt I am. While I know she desperately needs to have a good relationship with her father, it is hurtful to me that she seems to be indifferent to how much he has hurt and humiliated me. How do I rise above this and be supportive of her relationship with him as well as to teach her what a healthy relationship should look like? I do feel that finally saying enough is enough is a good model of having healthy respect for yourself, and I hope to model a healthy relationship for her and her brothers in the future.

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Lee

Thanks for writing this article. I’m not divorced yet, but unfortunately we’re getting there and I feel very strongly about shielding our two girls from this pain as much as possible. As much as I am hurt and want to lash out, this article has reminded me of the importance not to do so. Thanks. I know it’s common sense, but common sense is regularly taking a back seat right now.

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Hey Sigmund

You’re very welcome. I really get the need to want to lash out when a relationship breaks down. For sure common sense can disappear for a while – everyone has their limits – but if you can hold back as much as you can, your girls will be so grateful to you one day.

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Behaviour is never from ‘bad’. It’s from ‘big’. Big hungry, big tired, big disconnection, big missing, big ‘too much right now’. The reason our responses might not work can often be because we’ve misread the story, or we’ve missed an important piece of it. Their story might be about now, today, yesterday, or any of the yesterdays before now. 

Our job isn’t to fix them. They aren’t broken. Our job is to understand them. Only then can we steer our response in the right direction. Otherwise we’re throwing darts at the wrong target - behaviour, instead of the need behind the behaviour. 

Watch, listen, breathe and be with. Feel what they feel. This will help them feel you with them. We all feel safer and calmer when we feel our people beside us - not judging or hurrying or questioning. What don’t you know, that they need you to know?♥️
We all have first up needs. The difference between adults and children is that we can delay the meeting of these needs for a bit longer than children - but we still need them met. 

The first most important question the brain needs answered is, ‘Is my body safe?’ - Am I free from threat, hunger, exhaustion, pain? This is usually an easier one to take care of or to recognise when it might need some attention. 

The next most important question is, ‘Is my heart safe?’ - Am I loved, noticed, valued, claimed, wanted, welcome? This can be an easy one to overlook, especially in the chaos of the morning. Of course we love them and want them - and sometimes we’ll get distracted, annoyed, frustrated, irritated. None of this changes how much we love and want them - not even for a second. We can feel two things at once - madly in love with them and annoyed/ distracted/ frustrated. Sometimes though, this can leave their ‘Is my heart safe?’ needs a little hungry. They have less capacity than us to delay the meeting of these needs. When these needs are hungry, we’ll be more likely to see big feelings or big behaviour. 

The more you can fill their love tanks at the start of the day, the more they’ll be able to handle the bumps. This doesn’t have to be big. It just has to be enough. It might look like having a cuddle, reading a story, having a chat, sitting with them while they have breakfast or while they pat the dog, touching their back when they walk past, telling them you love them.

All brains need to feel loved and wanted, and as though they aren’t a nuisance, but sometimes they’ll need to feel it more. The more their felt sense of relational safety is met, the more they’ll be able to then focus on ‘thinking brain’ things, such as planning, making good decisions, co-operating, behaving. 

(And if this today was a bumpy one, that’s okay. Those days are going to happen. If most of the time their love tanks are full, they’ll handle when it drops a little. Just top it up when you can. And don’t forget to top yours up too. Be kind to yourself. You deserve it as much as they do.)♥️
Things will always go wrong - a bad decision, a good decision with a bad outcome, a dilemma, wanting something that comes with risk. 

Often, the ‘right thing’ lives somewhere in the very blurry bounds of the grey. Sometimes it will be about what’s right for them. Sometimes what’s right for others. Sometimes it will be about taking a risk, and sometimes the ‘right’ thing just feels wrong right now, or wrong for them. Even as adults, we will often get things wrong. This isn’t because we’re bad, or because we don’t know the right thing from the wrong thing, but because few things are black and white. 

The problem with punishment and harsh consequences is that we remove ourselves as an option for them to turn to next time things end messy, or as a guide before the mess happens. 

Feeling safe in our important relationships is a primary need for all of us humans. That means making sure our relationships are free from judgement, humiliation, shame, separation. If our response to their ‘wrong things’ is to bring all of these things to the table we share with them with them, of course they’ll do anything to avoid it. This isn’t about lying or secrecy. It’s about maintaining relational ‘safety’, or closeness.

Kids want to do the right thing. They want us to love and accept them. But they’re going to get things wrong sometimes. When they do, our response will teach them either that we are safe for them to come to no matter what, or that we aren’t. 

So what do we do when things go wrong? Embrace them, reject the behaviour:

‘I love that you’ve been honest with me. That means everything to me. I know you didn’t expect things to end up like this, but here we are. Let’s talk about what’s happened and what can be different next time.’

Or, ‘Something must have made this (wrong thing) feel like the right thing to do, otherwise you wouldn’t have done it. We all do that sometimes. What do you think it was that was for you?’

Or, ‘I know you know lying isn’t okay. What made you feel like you couldn’t tell me the truth? How can we build the trust again. Let’s talk about how to do that.’

You will always be their greatest guide, but you can only be that if they let you.♥️
Whenever there is a call to courage, there will be anxiety - every time. That’s what makes it brave. This is why challenging things, brave things, important things will often drive anxiety. 

At these times - when they are safe, but doing something hard - the feelings that come with anxiety will be enough to drive avoidance. When it is avoidance of a threat, that’s important. That’s anxiety doing it’s job. But when the avoidance is in response to things that are important, brave, meaningful, that avoidance only serves to confirm the deficiency story. This is when we want to support them to take tiny steps towards that brave thing. It doesn’t have to happen all at once.l and it doesn’t matter how long it takes. Brave is about being able to handle the discomfort of anxiety enough to do the important, challenging thing. It’s built in tiny steps, one after the other. 

We don’t have to get rid of their anxiety and neither do they. They can feel anxious, and do brave. At these times (safe, but scary) they need us to take a posture of validation and confidence. ‘I believe you, and I believe in you.’ ‘I know this feels big, and I know you can handle it.’ 

What we’re saying is we know they can handle the discomfort of anxiety. They don’t have to handle it well, and they don’t have to handle it for too long. Handling it is handling it, and that’s the substance of ‘brave’. 

Being brave isn’t about doing the brave thing, but about being able to handle the discomfort of the anxiety that comes with that. And if they’ve done that today, at all, or for a moment longer than yesterday, then they’ve been brave today. It doesn’t matter how messy it was or how small it was. Let them see their brave through your eyes.‘That was big for you wasn’t it. And you did it. You felt anxious, and you stayed with it. That’s what being brave is all about.’♥️
A relationally unsafe (emotionally unsafe) environment can cause as much breakage as as a physically unsafe one. 

The brain’s priority will always be safety, so if a person or environment doesn’t feel emotionally safe, we might see big behaviour, avoidance, or reduced learning. In this case, it isn’t the child that’s broken. It’s the environment.

But here’s the thing, just because a child doesn’t feel safe, doesn’t mean the person or environment isn’t safe. What it means is that there aren’t enough signals of safety - yet, and there’s a little more work to do to build this. ‘Safety’ isn’t about what is actually safe or not, it’s about what the brain perceives. Children might have the safest, warmest, most loving adult in front of them, but that doesn’t mean they’ll feel safe. This is when we have to look at how we might extend bigger cues of warmth, welcome, inclusiveness, and what we can do (or what roles or responsibilities can we give them) to help them feel valued and needed. This might take time, and that’s okay. Children aren’t meant to feel safe with every adult in front of them, so sometimes what they need most is our patience and understanding as we continue to build this. 

This is the way it works for all of us, everywhere. None of us will be able to give our best or do our best if we don’t feel welcome, liked, valued, and free from hostility, humiliation or judgement. 

This is especially important for our schools. A brain that doesn’t feel safe can’t learn. For schools to be places of learning, they first have to be places of relationship. Before we focus too sharply on learning support and behaviour management, we first have to focus on felt sense of safety support. The most powerful way to do this is through relationship. Teachers who do this are magic-makers. They show a phenomenal capacity to expand a child’s capacity to learn, calm big behaviour, and open up a child’s world. But relationships take time, and felt safety takes time. The time it takes for this to happen is all part of the process. It’s not a waste of time, it’s the most important use of it.♥️

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