How to Stay Motivated and Accomplish Your Goals

How to Stay Motivated and Accomplish Your Goals

Motivation is an important factor in accomplishing your goals. Without it, it will be more difficult to find the inspiration to reach for what you initially set your heart and mind to do. Fortunately, when motivation starts to dwindle, there are ways to bring it back. 

Here are some tips to stay motivated and on track to reach your goals:

  1. Visualize your goals.

    Visualization is a powerful, time-tested scientific tool that works at a subconscious level. When you set a goal, try visualizing the things you might see, feel and hear when you attain your goal (for example, the applause and the compliments of your colleagues after you delivered an excellent presentation). A lot of successful athletes use this technique to motivate themselves. They visualize their performance in advance and do this in such a detailed manner, that they can smell the sweat dripping from their face as they reach the finish line. An experiment was conducted with athletes in which some athletes were asked to run, and others were asked to visualize ‘as if’ they were running. Surprisingly the muscles of the athletes who visualized, responded in the same way as the people who actually ran, showing that the brain cannot clearly differentiate between reality and strong visualization! The brain perceives the visualized experience to be real, and organizes the body’s chemistry and physiology to respond accordingly. 

  1. Scrutinize your motivators.

    Know the specific reasons you want to attain a specific goal, and write these reasons down. For instance, if you want to attain something for your loved ones, this could be a powerful motivator as you’re not just motivated by self-interest. While self-interest is a good motivator, wanting to accomplish a goal for something other than self-interest can have more impact in sustaining your motivation for a long time. Some questions to ask are:

What are the greatest benefits for me if I achieve my goal?

What all will change positively in my life?

How will my life change when I achieve this?

How will I feel and how will my future look if I achieve this?

What kind of person can I become if I achieve this?

  1. Accept your mistakes.

    The path to attaining success may not be easy. There will be roadblocks along the way, and you’ll probably make mistakes in the process. Instead of beating yourself up for those mistakes, use them as learning opportunities. Don’t let them be the reasons you stop reaching for your goals. Use them as opportunities to learn what not to do in the future. Everyone makes mistakes! In fact, champions fail even more because they set higher goals than anyone else who chooses to be in the comfort zone. The only difference is how they treat their failures – champions learn from them, become stronger, and keep going. 

  2. Break down your main goal into chunks.

    Break your main goal into more task-oriented, smaller goals. Set a deadline for each one. For instance, if your primary goal is re-organizing your closet, know exactly when and where you should start. It could be your shoes, then belts and accessories, then shirts, etc. Breaking down a huge task into smaller ones will make the process more manageable, and will help to prevent the levels of stress which can damage motivation. By chunking it down or creating milestones, a big goal becomes more achievable and measurable. When you can measure and document progress and small success, this will help to sustain and builds more motivation.

  3. Compete with yourself.

    There are times when you tend to compare yourself with others and try to reach for perfection – making it harder to reach your goals. This can have a huge impact on your motivation, thereby sabotaging it, instead of maximizing it to push yourself forward. With that said it makes sense to compete with self and work on continuous improvement rather than getting bogged down by others or trying to race with others. It is definitely important to learn from others and their strategies, and model them if required, but remember, ‘whenever we just try to overtake people on the highway there will be always someone or the other ahead of us’.

Sustaining motivation can be tough, but with the right mindset and motivational training, you can tap into your inner motivation, harness it, and sustain it.


About the Author: Harrish Sairaman

Harrish SairamanHarrish Sairaman is a well-known motivational teacher in India, helping many to achieve which once seemed unachievable like increase motivation, leadership, Corporate Training, decrease stress etc. through Motivational Training Programs, Leadership training programs, team building training programs, Entrepreneur Coaching and Individual Coaching to name a few. His ability to deliver life changing, scientifically sound, relevant and metaphysical messages in a powerful, humorous and insightful manner integrated with high energy has earned him a reputation of bringing about a difference with a difference! 

Find out more about Harrish on www.harrishsairaman.comFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

2 Comments

Muhammad

Thanks for the tips. just like what Mr. Fawzy told me at almentor, just focus to your original goal and don’t make hasty decisions.

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‘Brave’ doesn’t always feel like certain, or strong, or ready. In fact, it rarely does. That what makes it brave.♥️
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#parenting #mindfulparenting #parentingtips
We teach our kids to respect adults and other children, and they should – respect is an important part of growing up to be a pretty great human. There’s something else though that’s even more important – teaching them to respect themselves first. 

We can’t stop difficult people coming into their lives. They might be teachers, coaches, peers, and eventually, colleagues, or perhaps people connected to the people who love them. What we can do though is give our kids independence of mind and permission to recognise that person and their behaviour as unacceptable to them. We can teach our kids that being kind and respectful doesn’t necessarily mean accepting someone’s behaviour, beliefs or influence. 

The kindness and respect we teach our children to show to others should never be used against them by those broken others who might do harm. We have to recognise as adults that the words and attitudes directed to our children can be just as damaging as anything physical. 

If the behaviour is from an adult, it’s up to us to guard our child’s safe space in the world even harder. That might be by withdrawing support for the adult, using our own voice with the adult to elevate our child’s, asking our child what they need and how we can help, helping them find their voice, withdrawing them from the environment. 

Of course there will be times our children do or say things that aren’t okay, but this never makes it okay for any adult in your child’s life to treat them in a way that leads them to feeling ‘less than’.

Sometimes the difficult person will be a peer. There is no ‘one certain way’ to deal with this. Sometimes it will involve mediation, role playing responses, clarifying the other child’s behaviour, asking for support from other adults in the environment, or letting go of the friendship.

Learning that it’s okay to let go of relationships is such an important part of full living. Too often we hold on to people who don’t deserve us. Not everyone who comes into our lives is meant to stay and if we can help our children start to think about this when they’re young, they’ll be so much more empowered and deliberate in their relationships when they’re older.♥️
When we are angry, there will always be another emotion underneath it. It is this way for all of us. 

Anger itself is a valid emotion so it’s important not to dismiss it. Emotion is e-motion - energy in motion. It has to find a way out, which is why telling an angry child to calm down or to keep their bodies still will only make things worse for them. They might comply, but their bodies will still be in a state of distress. 

Often, beneath an angry child is an anxious one needing our help. It’s the ‘fight’ part of the fight or flight response. As with all emotions, anger has a job to do - to help us to safety through movement, or to recruit support, or to give us the physical resources to meet a need or to change something that needs changing. It doesn’t mean it does the job well, because an angry brain means the feeling brain has the baton, while the thinking brain sits out for a while. What it means is that there is a valid need there and this young person is doing their very best to meet it, given their available resources in the moment or their developmental stage. 

Children need the same thing we all need when we’re feeling fierce - to be seen,  heard, and supported; to find a way to get the energy out, either with words or movement. Not to be shut down or ‘fixed’. 

Our job isn’t to stop their anger, but to help them find ways to feel it and express it in ways that don’t do damage. This will take lots of experience, and lots of time - and that’s okay.♥️
The SCCR Online Conference 2021 is a wonderful initiative by @sccrcentre (Scottish Centre for Conflict Resolution) which will explore ’The Power of Reconnection’. I’ve been working with SCCR for many years. They do incredible work to build relationships between young people and the important adults around them, and I’m excited to be working with them again as part of this conference.

More than ever, relationships matter. They heal, provide a buffer against stress, and make the world feel a little softer and safer for our young people. Building meaningful connections can take time, and even the strongest relationships can feel the effects of disconnection from time to time. As part of this free webinar, I’ll be talking about the power of attachment relationships, and ways to build relationships with the children and teens in your life that protect, strengthen, and heal. 

The workshop will be on Monday 11 October at 7pm Brisbane, Australia time (10am Scotland time). The link to register is in my story.
There are many things that can send a nervous system into distress. These can include physiological (tired, hungry, unwell), sensory overload/ underload, real or perceived threat (anxiety), stressed resources (having to share, pay attention, learn new things, putting a lid on what they really think or want - the things that can send any of us to the end of ourselves).

Most of the time it’s developmental - the grown up brain is being built and still has a way to go. Like all beautiful, strong, important things, brains take time to build. The part of the brain that has a heavy hand in regulation launches into its big developmental window when kids are about 6 years old. It won’t be fully done developing until mid-late 20s. This is a great thing - it means we have a wide window of influence, and there is no hurry.

Like any building work, on the way to completion things will get messy sometimes - and that’s okay. It’s not a reflection of your young one and it’s not a reflection of your parenting. It’s a reflection of a brain in the midst of a build. It’s wondrous and fascinating and frustrating and maddening - it’s all the things.

The messy times are part of their development, not glitches in it. They are how it’s meant to be. They are important opportunities for us to influence their growth. It’s just how it happens. We have to be careful not to judge our children or ourselves because of these messy times, or let the judgement of others fill the space where love, curiosity, and gentle guidance should be. For sure, some days this will be easy, and some days it will feel harder - like splitting an atom with an axe kind of hard.

Their growth will always be best nurtured in the calm, loving space beside us. It won’t happen through punishment, ever. Consequences have a place if they make sense and are delivered in a way that doesn’t shame or separate them from us, either physically or emotionally. The best ‘consequence’ is the conversation with you in a space that is held by your warm loving strong presence, in a way that makes it safe for both of you to be curious, explore options, and understand what happened.♥️
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#mindfulparenting #positiveparenting #parenting

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